Dark Ages
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 144

Dark Ages

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2006
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  • Publisher: MIT Press

During the Dark Ages, the progress of Western civilization virtually stopped. The knowledge gained by the scholars of the classical age was lost; for nearly 600 years, life was governed by superstitions and fears fueled by ignorance. In this outspoken and forthright book, Lee McIntyre argues that today we are in a new Dark Age -- that we are as ignorant of the causes of human behavior as people centuries ago were of the causes of such natural phenomena as disease, famine, and eclipses. We are no further along in our understanding of what causes war, crime, and poverty -- and how to end them -- than our ancestors. We need, McIntyre says, another scientific revolution; we need the courage to a...

Readings in the Philosophy of Social Science
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 785

Readings in the Philosophy of Social Science

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1994
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  • Publisher: MIT Press

the first comprehensive anthology in the philosophy of social science to appear since the late 1960s

Laws and explanation in the social sciences
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 197

Laws and explanation in the social sciences

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1996-02-01
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  • Publisher: Westview Pr

Pursuing an analogy with the natural sciences, Lee McIntyre, in this first full-length defense of social scientific laws to appear in the last twenty years, upholds the prospect of the nomological explanation of human behavior against those who maintain that this approach is impossible, impractical, or irrelevant.

Political Research
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 440

Political Research

This new book has been designed to equip students of politics and international relations with the analytical skills and resources to evaluate, understand and criticise research findings in political research, as well as the practical skills to carry out their own research.

Two Models of Jewish Philosophy
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 262

Two Models of Jewish Philosophy

In a work that illustrates how Jewish philosophy can make a genuine contribution to general philosophical debate, Daniel Rynhold attempts to formulate a model for the justification of practices by applying the methods of modern analytic philosophy to approaches to the rationalization of the commandments from the history of Jewish philosophy. Through critical analysis of the methods of Moses Maimonides and Joseph Soloveitchik, Rynhold argues against propositional approaches tojustifying practices that he terms Priority of Theory approaches and offers instead his own method, termed the Priority of Practice, which emphasizes the need for a more pragmatic take on this whole issue.

Re-Visioning the Church
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 444

Re-Visioning the Church

Re-Visioning the Church, the outcome of nearly two decades of research, applies a social scientific and historical outlook to the emergence, development, and ongoing mission and ministry of the church. Establishing a critical framework for understanding the structures of the church, the work explores the religious, cultural, and social dimensions of what it means to be the church and what structures and ministries form the foundation of ecclesial life. The heart of the project is a detailed account of the history and development of the church that takes the story from the apostolic band to the Second Vatican Council.

Karl Popper and the Social Sciences
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 157

Karl Popper and the Social Sciences

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2012-02-01
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  • Publisher: SUNY Press

The first systematic treatment of Karl Popper’s contribution to the philosophy of the social sciences.

Encyclopedia of Law and Society
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 76

Encyclopedia of Law and Society

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2007
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  • Publisher: SAGE

None

The Possibility of Anthropological Fideism
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 228

The Possibility of Anthropological Fideism

In this book, D. Z. Zhong establishes a methodological principle for cross-cultural research, called anthropological fideism. While anthropologists take for granted that natives don't really believe the unintelligible or inexplicable things they say, and what they say should express a deeper social meaning, Zhong contends that if we have a translation manual that can interpret a foreign language, and if natives are asserting honestly, then what natives say still express natives' belief, no matter how absurd it seems. His anthropological fideism entails that in fact we can, and indeed we should, happily live with others' differences while taking them literal.

The Functions of Law
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 210

The Functions of Law

  • Categories: Law

What is the nature of law and what is the best way to discover it? This book argues that law is best understood in terms of the social functions it performs wherever it is found in human society. In order to support this claim, law is explained as a kind of institution and as a kind of artefact. To say that it is an institution is to say that it is designed for creating and conferring special statuses to people so as to alter their rights and responsibilities toward each other. To say that it is an artefact is to say that it is a tool of human creation that is designed to signal its usability to people who interact with it. This picture of law's nature is marshalled to critique theories of l...